SpringerOpen Newsletter

Receive periodic news and updates relating to SpringerOpen.

Open Access Research

Short- and long-term outcomes of HIV-infected patients admitted to the intensive care unit: impact of antiretroviral therapy and immunovirological status

David Morquin126*, Vincent Le Moing2, Thibaut Mura34, Alain Makinson2, Kada Klouche5, Olivier Jonquet15, Jacques Reynes2 and Philippe Corne1

Author Affiliations

1 Medical Intensive Care Unit, Gui de Chauliac Teaching Hospital, University of Montpellier 1, Montpellier, France

2 Infectious and Tropical Diseases Department, UMI 233, Gui de Chauliac Teaching Hospital, Montpellier, France

3 Department of Medical Information, Lapeyronie Teaching Hospital, Montpellier, France

4 Inserm, Clinical Investigation Center 1001, Saint-Eloi Teaching Hospital, Montpellier, France

5 Medical Intensive Care Unit, Lapeyronie Teaching Hospital, University of Montpellier 1, Montpellier, France

6 Medical Intensive Care Unit, Gui de Chauliac Teaching Hospital, 80 avenue Augustin Fliche, Montpellier, Cedex 5, 34295, France

For all author emails, please log on.

Annals of Intensive Care 2012, 2:25  doi:10.1186/2110-5820-2-25

Published: 4 July 2012

Abstract

Background

The purpose of this study was to assess the short- and long-term outcomes of HIV-infected patients admitted to intensive care units (ICU) according to immunovirological status at admission and highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) use in ICU.

Methods

Retrospective study of 98 HIV-infected patients hospitalized between 1997 and 2008 in two medical ICU in Montpellier, France. The primary outcome was mortality in ICU. The secondary end point was probability of survival in the year following ICU admission.

Results

Eighty-two (83.6%) admissions in ICU were related to HIV infection and 45% of patients had received HAART before admission. Sixty-two patients (63.3%) were discharged from ICU, and 34 (34.7%) were alive at 1 year. Plasma HIV RNA viral load (VL) and CD4+ cell count separately were not associated with outcome. Independent predictors of ICU mortality were the use of vasopressive agents (odds ratio (OR), 3.779; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.11–12.861; p = 0.0334) and SAPS II score (OR, 1.04; 95% CI, 1.003-1.077; p = 0.0319), whereas introducing or continuing HAART in ICU was protective (OR, 0.278; 95% CI, 0.082-0.939; p = 0.0393). Factors independently associated with 1-year mortality were immunovirological status with high VL (>3 log10/ml) and low CD4 (<200/mm3; hazard ratio (HR), 5.19; 95% CI, 1.328-20.279; p = 0.0179) or low VL (<3 log10/ml) and low CD4 (HR, 4.714; 95% CI, 1.178-18.867; p = 0.0284) vs. high CD4 and low VL, coinfection with C hepatitis virus (HR, 3.268; 95% CI, 1.29-8.278; p = 0.0125), the use of vasopressive agents (HR, 3.68; 95% CI, 1.394-9.716; p = 0.0085), and SAPS II score (HR, 1.09; 95% CI, 1.057-1.124; p <0.0001). Introducing HAART in a patient with no HAART at admission was associated with a better long-term outcome (HR, 0.166; 95% CI, 0.043-0.642; p = 0.0093).

Conclusions

In a population of HIV-infected patients admitted to ICU, short- and long-term outcomes are related to acute illness severity and immunovirological status at admission. Complementary studies are necessary to identify HIV-infected patients who benefit from HAART use in ICU according to immunovirological status and the reasons of ICU admission.

Keywords:
Intensive care units; Human immunodeficiency virus; Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome; Antiretroviral therapy; Prognostic factors; Critical care; Mortality